Humla


Of the 72 districts that make up the administrative regions of Nepal,  Humla in the far west is one of the poorest and most remote. In a country that is already remote by its mountainous geography and already amongst the poorest in the world, its saying a lot about Humla. It’s a food deficit area where the crops that grow will not feed locals for more than 5 months out of the year, it’s people, usually the men folk, migrate to work as wage labors to the lowlands to earn money to buy food to feed their families. So in recent times development organizations have been looking at tourism as a way of improving the livelihood of people here.

Humla, despite its disadvantages has a very rich and well preserved culture, and its remoteness has preserved its natural beauty in a way that makes it a fascinating place to visit. It is a gateway for visitors to the sacred mountains of Kailash in Tibet and the holy Mansarvor lakes. There are also a number of treks that one can undertake in the Limi valley. Access is however limited with only the airport at Simikot servicing the area,  the next closest airport being Talcha in the Mugu district, about 3 days walk away, the nearest road a further 3 days walk form Talcha.